Étiquettes » Cannes Film Festival

Saul fia | Son of Saul (2015)

The latest recipient of the Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film, Son of Saul (also known as Saul fia) is an exceptionally powerful, relentlessly grim & downright disturbing cinema that takes a leaflet out of mankind’s darkest phase and weaves an original, absorbing & deeply affecting story around it, all depicted in a manner that only magnifies the haunting horrors of the Holocaust. 701 mots de plus

Drama

Review: The Happiest Day in the Life of Olli Mäki (2016)

by Antonio Cabello Ruiz-Burruecos 

The Happiest Day in the Life of Olli Mäki (Hymyilevä mies, 2016) is a beautiful, honest, transparent black and white film of the purest cinematographic instinct. 441 mots de plus

Review

I, Daniel Blake - Film Review

I didn’t go into I, Daniel Blake expecting an uplifting film by any means, but the amount that Ken Loach’s latest release moved me was surprising. 285 mots de plus

Film Reviews

The Big Flat

Nestled in a private residence of high standing and beautiful gardens.  Located in Cannes’ exclusive Montrose neighborhood, in La Californie Pezou, the apartment dazzles with an unforgettable setting, beautiful landscaping and park. 57 mots de plus

Cannes

SPOTLIGHT // I, Daniel Blake

After watching I, Daniel Blake, a friend asked: ‘Did you enjoy it?’ My first thought was, does anyone actually enjoy Ken Loach films, a director who over the past 40 years has tackled some of the grittiest social economic problems of the UK?  443 mots de plus

Reviews

Interview with Cristian Mungiu

By Anita Malhotra

Romanian film director Cristian Mungiu has distinguished himself with a series of award-winning films that explore social issues in Romania in a highly realistic style. 3 000 mots de plus

FILM

FILM REVIEW: Laurence Anyways (Dolan, 2012): Canada

Reviewed by Larry Gleeson.

Viewed during the Santa Barbara International Film. Laurence Anyways, is a visual feast as Canadian director, Xavier Dolan, tells a love story between two highly charged individuals, Fred, played by Suzanne Clement a fashionable female film and television producer, and Laurence, played by Melvil Poupad, an up and coming successful, thirty-something in his own right who has decided he wants to be a woman and that he’s always wanted to be a woman. 490 mots de plus

Film